In the Trenches, Part 2

1435134261 f1e41532f9 In the Trenches, Part 2from sarah the sewist

I’m making good progress on the Indygo Junction Trench Topper that I’m sewing as part of the Trench Coat Sew Along on Pattern Review. It’s been fun being motivated by knowing that others are working on similar projects at the same time (and I feel a bit of extra pressure for it to look extra-fabulous); however, this project has had some silly problems.

First, the ones that are beyond my control: the sleeve markings are screwy on this trench coat—basically, there’s no way to tell which side of the sleeve is the front and which is the back; the neck facing is way wide than the shoulder facing that it’s supposed to be joined with, so I had to fix that issue; and the belt for the trench is waaaaaay to short. Like seven inches too short. Anyway, I worked through those issues, and am on the home stretch at this point. As an aside, I emailed the lovely folks at Indygo Junction and let them know about the problems I’d had with the drafting of the pattern, and they were fabulous, and seemed very appreciative of the feedback. I was very impressed—I’ve sent my observations of errors/issues in patterns to other companies (I figure everyone has an interest in having high quality patterns) and they’re not always so receptive. Thanks, Indygo Junction!

Now, the issue that was basically my stubbornness getting the best of me. I’m using some really big buttons for this project. Like 1 5/8″ in diameter. I needed to make one buttonhole. Well, since Josh and I got our fancy schmancy new Janome-made Kenmore 19233 sewing machine that has one-step automatic buttonholes, making buttonholes has been a dream. Seriously, this is probably my second-favorite feature on the machine (this first being the speed control). However, apparently, the auto feature doesn’t allow for buttons over one inch. So I searched the owners manual, then the internet, then all of the Pattern Review message boards that had any reference to buttonholes, and Kenmore sewing machines. Then I just cried. Because I just couldn’t make a stupid buttonhole. (Someone on Pattern Review posted the directions for overriding the auto function for the Janome equivalent machine, but it just wouldn’t work for me.)

Anyway, I experimented.

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A lot.

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Finally, I just fudged it, and it looks okay. I don’t care that it’s not perfect. At least I can get the damn button in the damn buttonhole and close the stupid thing. And that’s all I really wanted.

1435913042 e9998ba378 o In the Trenches, Part 2
On the home stretch…

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2 thoughts on “In the Trenches, Part 2

  1. I’m so glad you’ve posted this. I have a Janome 4800 and, like you, love the automatic buttonhole feature. It had occurred to me that I would someday need to make a large buttonhole, larger than the automatic feature could handle, and I had no idea how to do that. I’ll have to search for that override. In the meantime, I’ve just learned to make bound buttonholes for large buttons by taking Kenneth King’s class on PR. It’s a great class and the buttonholes are lovely!

    Your fabrics are adorable and I can’t wait to see your finished trench!

    Tiner

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