Sunday Sewing Heritage: Airplane Wings

2996512798 843f455bd1 Sunday Sewing Heritage: Airplane Wings

Did you know that airplanes used to be stitched together, and then epoxied? I had heard mention of it in documentaries and such, but the reality of the construction of aircraft literally from cloth didn’t really register with me until I saw these photos of women during World War II sewing together the wings of a plane.

2996515998 b755515385 Sunday Sewing Heritage: Airplane Wings

There’s something quite elegant about it, isn’t there?

~Sarah

Photos from the Library of Congress image collection.
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One thought on “Sunday Sewing Heritage: Airplane Wings

  1. Were these planes actually the gliders, for instance those used following D-Day and the invasion of Normandy. I had no idea hand sewing was the method for finishing those wings! Actually, I gave it no consideration, thinking it was done by a machine. It is great to know more of the variety of jobs for the war effort, not the most obvious and romanticized ones.

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